Equine Ophthalmology

deborah y strauss dvmA GENERAL OVERVIEW OF OPHTHALMIC DISEASES

DR. DEBORAH Y. STRAUSS D.V.M.

The equine eye is the largest of any land mammal. Its visual abilities are directly related to the animals behavior and the fact that the horses is a flight animal. An understanding of the horses eye can help to discover why the animal behaves as it does. This is an informational site to horse owners to help recognize abnormalities in the eye of your horse. Every slight change in the eye of a horse is an absolute veterinary emergency. Waiting 24 to 48 hours after you notice the change can drastically effect the treatment of the condition and the preservation of vision. It is vital to contact a veterinarian immediately when you notice any changes in the eye of your horse. Dr. Deborah Y. Strauss D.V.M. works in the state of Iowa. This Doctor tries to always be available for all equine ophthalmic emergencies. Contact information for Dr. Deborah Strauss D.V.M. can be found at the end of this posting.  Some of the disorders of the equine eye can include: Equine Recurrent Uveitis, Corneal Abrasions. Corneal Ulcers, Puncture Wounds, deborah y strauss dvmBacterial Infections, Fungal Infections, Keratitis, Conjunctivitis. Habronema, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca, Neoplastic Disease (cancer) of the eyeball and surrounding tissue, along with a host of other disorders not mentioned here. The biggest mistake that the majority of horse owners make is going online to self-diagnose an eyeball disorder their horse is currently experiencing. The internet, unfortunately, is filled with information that is false and incomplete. This type of information on an eyeball disorder can lead to complete blindness. For this reason, Dr. Deborah Strauss D.V.M. has created this informational site to help horse owners with eyeball problems in their horses. The truth is, that any time an equine owner sees a problem in the eyeball, or surrounding tissue of the eye, a veterinarian needs to be contacted immediately. As stated earlier, every eye problem in every horse is a veterinary equine emergency. There are no exceptions to this rule. Dr. Strauss cannot state this strongly enough.

NORMAL APPEARANCE OF THE EQUINE EYE

The normal equine eye should have: no swelling in the external tissue surrounding thedeborah y strauss dvm eye, no swelling in the conjunctiva of the eye, the cornea should be clear, there should be no fine blood vessels growing on the cornea, there should be no erosions present on the cornea, the eyeball should not appear larger than normal, the white of the eye should not be red, the pupil should be black, the iris should not change colors, there should be no tearing or squinting of the eye, the horses should not be rubbing his eye. This is only a small portion of abnormal signs to look for. If any other abnormalities are seen, a veterinarian needs to be contacted immediately.

 ANATOMY OF THE EQUINE EYE

The following images are diagrams of the normal structure of the equine eye. 

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Normal anatomical structure of the equine eye and external surrounding tissues.

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Internal anatomical structure of the equine eye. All labeled parts in this illustration can be severely affected in any equine eye disorder.

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 Image of a healthy equine eye.

EQUINE FIELD OF VISION 

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How your horse see’s.

ABOUT: DR. DEBORAH Y. STRAUSS D.V.M.

Dr. Deborah Y. Strauss D.V.M. has been a fully licensed veterinarian since 1998 when she graduated from the Iowa State School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Deborah Strauss D.V.M. has adopted horses who suffer from severe ophthalmic disorders. Due to this fact, Dr. Strauss is especially dedicated to the problems of horses with vision problems. Deborah Strauss’s unique experience with her own vision impaired horses gives her an unique empathy for owners trying to treat severe eye conditions in their own horses. The treatment of some serious equine ophthalmic disorders is labor intensive, expensive, and can be very long term. Dr. Deborah Y. Strauss D.V.M. is highly educated veterinarian and also holds a degree in Fine Art, were she also does work as a professional artist in fine art illustration and fine art photography. Dr. Strauss’s art web site can be found at deborahystraussart.com.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Dr. Strauss has practiced in the state of Iowa since 1998. If you have a horses suffering from an eye disorder and would like to make an appointment, or if you have any questions, Dr. Strauss can be reaches at 319/521-1099. Feel free to call. Attached below will be a slide show of what various equine ophthalmic disorders can look like. Keep in mind that a specific ophthalmic disorder that your horse is suffering  from may appear different than the images shown in the slide show. The bottom line is that, a veterinarian should be called when your horse’s eye appears to be abnormal in any way, shape, or form. 

SLIDE SHOW OF ABNORMAL EQUINE OPHALMIC DISORDERS: